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FC Archery News – Systema Martial Arts Toronto : Fight-Club.ca

The Power of Stillness

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Parents and Archers,

The ability to stay still – what a rare skill these days. The world at our fingertips, anytime and anywhere but without stillness how do we reflect on what it all means? Time slows, understandings grow, and knowledge builds when I shoot my bow. I hope and wish that all students learning archery at FightClub find these things too.

Olympic Gold Medalist in Shooting Peter Wilson wrote about this very subject not to long ago …

 

The Power of Stillness

 by Olympic Gold Medalist in Shooting Peter Wilson

The word ‘sport’ conjures up images of athletes pushing, grunting sweating or panting in a bid to get faster, higher or stronger. But some prize stillness – both in mind and body. I’m talking about mental sports like archery.

The arm pumping or leg lunging movements of sprinters or footballers are distilled into a slow, almost imperceptible squeeze of a trigger. It’s not about kilometers or even meters of movement but millimeters. Maintaining this kind of physical stillness in the heat of competition requires serious mind control. The heart is pumping but adrenaline is the enemy.

A raised heart rate may cause a slight shift in arm position but also a momentary mental drift and the focus is lost. I’ve worked with a few archers shooters and the zen-like state they aim to reach is remarkably similar to that of meditation. A shooter may take 40 shots in a match but the shot being taken is the only one that matters – it’s the very essence of here and now.

If the shot before was bad the mind frets about the future score. If the shot was good the mind anticipates success: both are bad.

The yogic sage Patanjali wrote ‘yoga is the stilling of the thought waves of the mind’ in his Yoga Sutras. Yoga has a vast range of techniques to reel in a jittery mind easily adapted to mental sports. Breathing exercises used both pre-match and in between shot cycles, to pre-shot visualization and meditation. Mindfulness is also useful as it teaches us to stay both alerts but anchored to the present moment.

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“TARGET PANIC”

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Archers,

When ‘aiming’ take note of what your eye is focusing on. The target? Your arrow tip or pin scope? Try to teach your eye to stay focused on one thing throughout the shot – The Target!

The eye has a tendency to change what it focuses on through the course of the shot. This can confuse our brain and subconscious. The result is no clear message sent to our shooting muscles, which can turn into what is commonly called, “TARGET PANIC”!

After you lift the bow to the target and draw to anchor take a second to settle into your ‘full draw’, look at the target (no need to shoot yet). Just simply look at the target and let the string slowly slip from your fingers. Don’t try time the shoot or predict when to let it go. The beautiful thing about archery is that it is so simple, but not easy. Enjoy the process and you will learn a lot.

See you this Friday and I will explain more about ‘Target Panic’

emmanuel

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Holding Steady

Category : FC Archery News

 

We have worked on so many different aspects of shooting our bows over the last 6 weeks – everything from your stance – the way you align your feet and body before beginning the shot – to gripping the bow,  nocking the arrow, drawing the bowstring, and finding your anchor point. Now you’re ready to take aim and arrow your target.

The first step of aiming involves transferring weight into your back muscles. Once you anchor after draw your bow back, you must transfer the held weight from your arms into your back muscles. This makes it much easier to hold the bow steady. You transfer this weight into your back by moving your draw arm away from you, and your scapula (or shoulder blade) toward your spine.  Think of it like drawing a circle with your shoulder blade. Once the bow weight is in your back muscles your arms can relax a little to ‘release’ the arrow. If your moving before the shoot your accuracy will be compromised. Holding steady is a tricky thing to explain but very important to overall success in archery.

 

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Emmanuel takes 1st!

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Archers,

With Friday being a PA day and Monday Family day it looks like a lot of you have places to go and things to do. So let’s move the Youth Archery class to 9:30-10: 30 am this Friday. This should give you more flexibility with your Family Day long weekend.

Let me know if you have any questions either by email archery@fight-club.ca or 416-200-0200.

Emmanuel Takes First Place last Sunday

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Let it Fly!!

Category : FC Archery News

 

You simply release the tension in your bow string fingers and let the arrow fly. That’s it! Relax all three fingers at once and let the string jump forward by itself. You don’t need to do anything but let go—the energy stored in the limbs at full draw will pull the string forward with great force, so there’s nothing you need to do. Letting your hand brush past your face is called a “dynamic release.” 

No Plucking the String

All you have to do is release the string; no theatrics, no forcefully bringing your hand back. You’re just letting go—that’s it!

No Pushing the Bow

Both new archers and experienced archers can fall into the tendency of moving the bow ever-so-slightly after the arrow has been released, and that—like absolutely everything else!—can mess up your shot. You want to keep your bow arm as still as possible as the arrow clears the shelf and moves toward your target. The bow will likely dip forward a little, especially if you’ve got a very relaxed grip, and that’s totally OK.

 

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