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A Brief History of Archery

Category : FC Archery News

Exploring archery’s roots in societies around the world, long before the present day.
 
Archery is one of the oldest arts still practiced. This history will not only take you through a journey on the evolution of archery, but also through the history of mankind. Evidence of ancient archery has been found throughout the world.
Although archery probably dates to the Stone Age (around 20,000 BC), the earliest people known to have used bows and arrows were the ancient Egyptians, who adopted archery at least 5,000 years ago for purposes of hunting and warfare.
In China, archery dates back to the Shang dynasty (1766-1027 BC). A war chariot of that time carried a three-man team: driver, lancer and archer. During the ensuing Zhou (Chou) dynasty (1027-256 BC) nobles at court attended sport archery tournaments that were accompanied by music and interspersed with elegant salutations.
DEVELOPMENT IN ASIA
When the Chinese introduced archery to Japan in the sixth century, it had an overriding influence on later etiquette and techniques. One of Japan’s martial arts was originally known as kyujutsu (the art of the bow), now known as kyudo (way of the bow).
Modern Kyudo is practiced primarily as a method of physical, moral, and spiritual development. After certain ritual movements, the archer moves to the shooting line and shoots from a distance of 28 meters at a target 36 cm in diameter set in a bank of sand that is roofed over. The bow used is 2.21 metres long and made of laminated strips of bamboo and wood.
In the Greco-Roman period, the bow was more used for personal exploits or hunting, rather than warfare.
Archers are frequently seen on pottery at that time. The Parthians were horsemen who developed the skill of swivelling around in the saddle and could shoot backwards at full gallop.
Middle Eastern superiority in archery equipment and technique continued for centuries. With bows like those of the Assyrians and Parthians, Attila the Hun and his Mongols conquered much of Europe and Asia, and Turkish archers threw back the Crusaders. The Asian and Turkish bows were highly efficient and the record shot with a composite Turkish flight bow was close to 900 yards, far beyond the capability of an English yew bow.
MYTHOLOGY
The popularity of archery is reflected in the many ballads and folklore, such as for instance Robin Hood, to name the most famous one.
References to archery are also frequently made in Greek mythology, in which the story told of Odysseus in Book 21 of the Odyssey is a well-known example. Odysseus is mentioned as being eminently skilled in the art of archery. Penelope, thinking that her husband will never come back after 20 years of absence, forms a resolution to determine which of her suitors shall receive her hand by shooting with Odysseus’ bow. Odysseus, back from the Trojan war and disguised as a shepherd, is the only one able to draw his own bow and shoot an arrow through twelve rings. This way he can prove to his wife who he is and defeat all of those who had taken advantage of his long absence.
English literature also honours the longbow for famous victories in the battles of Crecy, Agincourt and Poitiers. The first known organised competition in archery was held at Finsbury, England in 1583 and included 3,000 participants! By the time of the 30 Years War (1618-1648) it was clear that, due to the introduction of gunpowder, the bow as weapon belonged in the past.
Since then, archery has developed as a recreational and competitive sport.
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March Break Closure

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Archers,

Just a quick reminder that FightClub Archery Program will be closed from Friday March 10th till Saturday March 18th for March Break. Regular class schedule resumes after March 19th.

 

Have a fun and safe March Break Everyone!

 

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Archery Drills

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Archers,

 

Here are a few great archery drills I use to help all aspects of my shooting skills. We will try some of them this week. 

 

See you on the range,
Emmanuel 

 

Archery Drills
Archery drills are designed to improve your accuracy and ability to shoot arrows in a straight and consistent manner. In addition to accuracy, archery drills will also help you improve your form and mechanics while shooting. Archery drills range from aiming drills to bow hand check drills.

 

Aiming Drill
This aiming drill will help improve your accuracy and precision on the archery range. Draw your bow, standing 20 feet away from the mark, and aim directly at the X on the target. Once the bow is aimed directly at the X, hold your aim for as long as you can. Instead of releasing the bow, bring the bow down and relax. Repeat this three times. Once you feel comfortable, move an additional 5 feet away from the mark and repeat.

 

Pipping the Ace Drill
This drill is designed to improve accuracy and precision in your shot. Tack an ace playing card on a target. From here, step 10 yards away from the target and draw your bow. Shoot toward the card, attempting to hit the suit displayed in the middle of the card. From here, count the number of times it takes you to hit that mark on the card. As you improve, step farther and farther away from the target.
 
Bow Hand Check Drill
This bow hand check drill is designed to improve your consistency with respect to your bow hand position. Place a small piece of tape on the bow handle, just above where you normally place your hand. From here, place your hand in its normal position. Place an additional piece of tape on your hand, right next to the piece of tape that is on the handle. Shoot a round of six arrows, checking each time to ensure the tape on your hand and the tape on the bow match up.

 

Mirror Exercise Drill
The mirror exercise is designed to improve your muscle memory while improving your form. In addition, the exercise can be performed with or without an arrow in the bow. Stand in front of a mirror at a 45-degree angle. From here, draw your bow back, checking your mirror in the form by shifting your eyes directly towards the mirror without moving your head. After checking your form, relax, repeating the exercise 10 times before stopping.
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Anchor Point

Category : FC Archery News

It is vital that you draw the string back to exactly the same place every time, or you’ll never get a consistent grouping. The easiest way to do this is to let your fingers rest against the underside of your chin, with the string touching the exact centre of the front of your chin and nose. 

Drawing to some indeterminate part of the air in front of your face will mean that your draw length varies from shot to shot, and the vertical grouping will be poor. Drawing to some randomly chosen part of your jawline will, unless you can feel that your fingers are in exactly the same place each time, lead to a nice horizontal line across the target.

Always anchor with your fingers just underneath the centre of your chin. If you’re using your chin to anchor, you obviously need to make sure your chin is in the same place every time. An easy way to get your head at a consistent angle is to let the string rest against the tip of your nose while you’re at full draw.

This whole hand-chin-string-nose system should only come together at one particular angle, and it’s easy to feel when you’ve got it right. It also seems to be one of the things our inexperienced archers are worst at remembering, so it could be the easy way to improve your shooting.

Think Safe & Shoot Straight,

emmanuel

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Archery Tournament

Category : FC Archery News

Hey FC Archers,

Last week I competed in my second archery tournament of the year. The event was held in Caledon Ontario at ‘The Archers of Caledon’ Archery Club. 200 Plus archers competed in both recurve and compound bow divisions. This time I chose to compete in the compound senior division. I did good shooting 540/600 – Basically I shot 60 arrows on average in the 9/10 ring (very close to bulls eye). 

There where many youth competitors too …. Good to see as I would like to encourage the kids to compete in the spring tournaments. 

The coaching classes every Friday are focusing on this as well to get them ready. 

See you on the range,

Emmanuel 

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