FightClub Club News

Are you Listening to Your Body?

August 27, 2018

 

Hey FC Crew,

What is your body telling you right now? Go through a quick check…

Is your face relaxed or tight? Is your breathing exhaled or held? Is your posture slumped and held or upright and balanced? Are your shoulders and neck tight and lifted or relaxed and down? Is your chest lifted high or relaxed? Is your head jutting forward or balanced on top of your spine? Are your shoulder blades pinched or relaxed? Is your belly pulled in and tight, or relaxed and smooth?

 

Go through every portion of your body and check once a day at lunch or during your personal time. This is the difference between a routine and a habit. A habit is rigid and fixed. You are compelled to repeat your habit and you feel anxious and uncomfortable if you do not. A routine is stable (consistent rather than fixed), plastic (it can transform to be specific to the intensity of the situation), adjustable (it can be changed to meet different tasks) and reliable (rather than predictable). It’s a toolbox rather than a hammer.

By staying aware of your body’s signals throughout the day you can be proactive and spontaneous about your tension. In this way, you can take short breaks to release the tension before a habit forms. Just two minutes suffices in most cases. If you’re uncomfortable doing it in front of other people, go to the bathroom and close the door.

Stress relief is so important and a big part of what I teach at FightClub. Breaking bad habit and creating great routines that help students grow and develop is not far behind!

 

“Tension is a habit. Relaxation is a habit.

Bad habits can be broken. Good habits can be formed”

 

Summer break is almost over and a regular schedule of classes starts on September 4th at FightClub!

 

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